Materials

The digital tools and formats for the historical projects: lifehacks and cases from Belarus, Ukraine and Poland.

Article

Author Ekaterina Semenyuk (Ukraine), Alina Dzeravianka (Belarus), with the participation of Agnieszka Koudelka (Poland)

The current situation connected with the COVID-19 pandemic has provoked the fact that some organizations have suspended their activities, others have forced to reconsider the traditional work formats. Therefore, we decided to present several cases of projects on historical topics that were adapted to new conditions and, based on their experience, tried to highlight some recommendations for the future projects. What to plan and how for 2021?
As part of the article, we will present the case of the #брюдершафт art project, which was implemented by The Naked Room gallery together with the Past / Future / Art memory culture platform in October in Ukraine, as well as the case of the international historical hackathon # hack4history, which took place in November in Minsk.

The culture of memory in the national and supranational contexts: ethics, digitalization, the formation of civilized relations

Article

Author Yuliya Sofronova (Russia)

This is a study, revealing the peculiarities of national and supranational culture of memory of war and its consequences, the formation of civilized, ethical relations, structural modernization of the commemorative space, “non-violent resistance” to ideological barriers. A great responsibility lies with the teaching community, it depends on the teachers which meanings will be offered to the younger generation for their own reflections on the Second World War.

Commemorative practices related to the history of Jews and the Holocaust on the example of Minsk, Odessa and Warsaw

Essay

Author Anzhelika Anoshko (Belarus), Olena Sinyavska (Ukraine), Aleksei Rogozin (Poland)

The main purpose of this essay is to compare commemorative practices related to the history of the Jewish population and the Holocaust in three cities of the former Eastern Bloc: Minsk, Odessa and Warsaw. Before World War II, all three cities were important multinational centers, with a large Jewish community in each of them. Jews participated in all spheres of social, political and cultural life. Today, in these three cities, we can find synagogues, Jewish cemeteries, museums and exhibitions, memorials, monuments, and even Jewish schools.

The image of the invader. Soviet and German soldiers in the eyes of local communities based on oral history studies.

Presentation

Author Marta Fraczkiewicz and Aleksandra Oczkowicz (Poland), Volha Malafeyechava (Belarus)

In the collective memory, soldiers who committed crimes are attributed non-human features. Ascribing inhuman characteristics to the tormentors allows the victims to tame the invaders, to reconcile with them. Despite the stereotypes established over the years (the German soldier - cruel, stiff, even inhuman, impeccably dressed; Soviet – poor, drunk, wild, looters), there are many testimonies by German and Soviet soldiers, which stand in opposition to the functioning of the official/collective stereotype and narrative.

HiStories around the corner - IWalks for teenagers

Presentation

Author Ekaterina Sherstennikova (Russia), Katarzyna Jankowska (Poland), Ekaterina Fedoruk and Dominic Borchert (Germany)

The project aims to make (local) history come alive and attractive for youngsters with the help of a digital app for smartphones that works as an interactive guide or an interactive tour (via app that links several places)

Youth about World War II: memory and perception

Presentation

Author Svetlana Teluha and Eugenia Protsenko (Ukraine), Larisa Salakhova, Lyubov Porotikova and Yuliya Sofronova (Russia)

What do students and schoolchildren from Ukraine and Russia know about the war, what they feel, how they perceive and evaluate, how they think, how they remember? How do families remember World War II and how are young people involved in the remembrance process? What do students and schoolchildren know about the war through social channels of information (school, traditional and modern communication channels)?

The sign will not be erased. The fate of Ostarbeiters in letters, memoirs and oral stories

Book

Author International Memorial

During the Great Patriotic War, the heroes of the book, the very young people from cities and villages of Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, were driven into Nazi Germany, where they were called Ostarbeiters (Eastern workers). Interviews, letters, memoirs, and photographs stored in the Memorial archive tell us about what they experienced in captivity and what they had to experience after returning to their homeland. Published for the first time, these documentary evidences of human destinies make us take a fresh look at the pages of war that seemed famous.

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Forced labor in the Third Reich

Comic book

Author International Memorial

The comic book tells about three women whose fate was determined by violent theft and work in German labor camps during the Second World War. Gelena is a Czech Jew from Volhynia who fled from the labor camp and joined the partisans. Yarmila volunteered to work in Germany to save herself from the Gestapo persecution. Francis was born to a Polish mother and a Czech father, who met and fell in love while working at a German arms factory.

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Eastern worker

Video

Author International Memorial

The cartoon was realized by students and schoolchildren during the cartoon practice of the Memorial. It is based on an archive collection on the history of forced labor in Nazi Germany, published on the websites tastorona.su and fond21.memo.ru

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Video interview of the former concentration camp prisoners

Video

Author Leonid Levin History Workshop

Former prisoners of the ghetto and concentration camps share their memories of the spring of 1945 in their lives. Witnesses of military events tell stories of mutual assistance and solidarity among prisoners from different countries and the hope for a better future in connection with the end of the war.


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